Dr Sara Read

Dr Sara Read

Academic, Novelist, Grandma, Dog Walker

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Maladies and Medicine

Maladies and Medicine

Health and Healing in History

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In 1655, Nicholas Culpeper’s The English Physitian was reissued. Culpeper died the year before, and this reissue was of a book first published at the end of 1652, in which Culpeper signed the address to his reader ‘Nich. Culpeper. Spittle-fields next door to the Red Lyon. Novemb. 1652’. In the days before house numbers properties were often […]

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In addition to my books academic or otherwise, I like to contribute articles to history periodicals. I have been writing for Discover Your Ancestors since 2013. Go to their website to read more (discoveryourancestors.co.uk). This is an annual publication, and I always look forward to seeing my pieces come out in this magazine (or bookazine […]

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I was delighted to be asked back to Andrea Zuvich’s ‘The Seventeenth Century Lady’ blog for a short chat about anachronisms and bloopers in works of historical fiction. You can read our conversation here. Andrea’s latest book A Year in the Life of Stuart Britain (2016) is available to buy in hardback or on Kindle

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I was asked at a recent talk if I had any favorites amongst the early modern women I research and write about, and Brilliana Conway, later Lady Harley (c 1600-1643) sprang to mind. We included a selection from her commonplace book written in 1622 and from her personal letters in our anthology Flesh and Spirit […]

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In 2014 Manchester University Press published an anthology I co-edited with Dr Rachel Adcock (Keele University) and Dr Anna Ziomek (Reading University). Flesh and Spirit is a collection of women’s writing by seventeenth-century women who understood their bodily and spiritual health to be inextricably connected. The summary reads: This anthology makes accessible to readers ten […]

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Read a review of Maids, Wives, Widows on Jem Bloomfield’s ‘Quite Irregular’ blog here. Maids, Mothers, Widows is an engrossing and brilliant book, which combines historical scholarship with a vivid style and a knack for the poignant or disturbing detail.   Dr Bloomfield’s own book Word of Power: Reading Shakespeare and the Bible (2016) is […]

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